eagle scout workbook 2018
Free eagle scout workbook 2018
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Free eagle scout workbook 2018 2017-2019

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FAQ

How does being an Eagle Scout help out while being in the military?
Good number of the answers cover the “factual” point that you will come into the military at the higher E3 grade (this also true for Gold Star Girl Scouts), and you could probably see a good number of Academy and ROTC folks that have these high recognition of youth achievement in their profiles too.Now the “subjective”. Those that achieve Eagle Scout and Gold Star have completed in their path Leadership, project management, resilience, citizenship engagement, life saving skills, emergency management, service, overall human engagement to and end purpose, a combined purpose. Absorption of many additional subjects and well, camping and the logistics of a camp is a skill.The perseverance to get to that milestone and what it tend to imbue in the character of the candidate has the ability to place them in not only a higher paygrade recognition, but also the expectation of the quality of character of that position, with the inherent expectation to go achieve higher.Eagle and Gold go a long way and imprsssive on any college application and resume.I was trying not to sound to pro-anything, just know that as someone who interviews candidates coming into the military and picking their trade Eagles and Stars standout before even seeing that certificate.
Is it possible to carry out an Eagle Scout project in 3 months?
Yes, absolutely.As many others have suggested, budgeting to have 6 months or a year is better, but 3 months is doable. I believe I have seen them go from idea to completion in as little as a month (with all approvals), but those are amazingly rare.The right follow on question is “How do I carry out an Eagle Scout project in just 3 months?”It is all about the project, especially the various layers of extra approval you have to go through for certain types of projects. Avoid projects that require government approval, such as zoning permits, building permits, inspections, or where a government agency or board is the recipient. It can be hard enough getting approval from your Scoutmaster, Committee Chair, District or Council representative, and the Beneficiary. Don’t add MORE required approvals.The ideal beneficiary is represented by a single person who has the authority to approve your project and accept it as done WITHOUT going to a “the board”, “ the membership”, or anyone else for approval. When you meet with your beneficiary, make sure you understand their level of authority to approve your project.The ideal project comes with its own funding. Some organizations that need work done have money for the materials, and they just need you to design the project, find the labor, and direct the project to completion. Many Eagles raise funds to complete their project, but that takes extra time, so avoid it if possible, if you are on a tight deadline.Be super polite about it, but do let those you are working with understand your timeline. Expect to bend over backwards to accommodate their needs if they are helping you to meet your schedule. (For example, I met with a scout about 9 or 10 PM on the day before his 18th birthday to sign some things for an Eagle Scout candidate. He drove to the campsite where the troop was camping, because that was where *I* was going to be on that day. A scout is helpful, and I was happy to help, but in that case he needed to come to me.)Be FLEXIBLE. (Or as they say in Woodbadge, “Semper Gumby. Always Flexible.”) Your ideal project might be an outdoor construction project like a trail or a dock. If the time you have left is December to February, and you are in Minnesota, it isn’t going to work. Pick something that is mostly or entirely indoors. (However, I have seen scouts build and install docks in Virginia in the winter, where they had to chip through the ice to get to the bottom of the pond to dig the underwater hole for the support posts. It is amazing what a motivated group of scouts can accomplish!)Good luck with your project!
How does it feel to be an Eagle Scout during the current negative discussions involving scouting?
I've always felt that the BSA should end its discriminatory policies against gay and atheist boys and leaders.  As such, I've proudly worn the "Inclusive Scouting Award"[1] on my uniform for years. This is an unofficial (and thus technically forbidden on the Class A uniform) knot/patch to show support for including those discriminated groups in the BSA.  I wore this throughout 7 years working in senior positions at an official BSA summer camp, and explained my positions to all who asked about it.  There were other staffers who did the same.While this particular issue deeply disappoints me, I don't fundamentally believe the BSA is a bad organization, or something I don't want to be associated with. As such, I wouldn't return my badge or medal, because I'm still quite proud of it, and also proud of my affiliation with so many of the best people I've ever known.  Large organizations are certain to have disagreements like this, but there's more than enough common ground to share and be proud of.  Of course I do hope that this policy changes, but I'll continue to support the BSA either way.If you're looking for an analogy you can relate to, consider whether you would renounce your American citizenship if Congress passed a constitutional amendment defining marriage as between one man and one woman. I certainly wouldn't, even though I'd disagree with such a decision.  I think most Americans feel the same way about most issues, which is why we're still united as one nation.[1]: http://www.inclusivescouting.net...
How hard is it to become an Eagle Scout?
For an exact answer, please read the following. It is a list of everything you need to do to become an Eagle Scout:https://filestore.scouting.org/f...However, here is a summary:-It requires time. Nineteen months is a minimum.-It requires effort. Scouts not only need to memorize things like the pledge of allegiance and the symptoms and treatment of a stroke but also demonstrate skills such as swimming, tying knots, using of a saw, and performing CPR. Scouts also have to complete tasks such as improving their physical fitness and performing research on a household purchase.-It requires active participation. In addition to sixteen months of vaguely defined being “active in [their] troop,” scouts also need to meet concrete requirements such as camping for twenty nights and participating in eighteen hours of community service not even counting the eagle project.-It requires responsibility. Scouts have to serve for a total of sixteen months in positions of responsibility within their troops.-It requires family involvement. Several requirements include a parent or guardian.-It requires community involvement. Scouts have to attend two community meetings as well as lead an eagle project, an in-depth service project for a community organization.-It requires leadership. Scouts must teach skills to their peers as well as complete the aforementioned eagle project.-It requires money. Uniforms, registration fees, camping equipment, camp costs, transportation, and other items pile up. The money doesn’t necessarily need to come from the scouts or their families, many troops hold fundraisers to pay some or all expenses.I think that covers all the major tangible and intangible factors that add up to the difficulty of earning the eagle rank. If anyone thinks I missed something major, please let me know.
How long should it take to make Eagle Scout?
That depends heavily on how hard one wants to work, and merit badges available in your area. Supposedly it can be done in 17 months (a year and five months.) In practice I’ve only heard of someone making it from entry into the program to Eagle in two years. On the other hand it can take as long as 8 years, given that someone can enter the program at ten and still get an Eagle right up until the 18th birthday (with occasional exception granted for special circumstances.)In my experience four to five years is the fun pace, because that’s what the program should be. It can be cut to three if a scout is willing to go to two merit badge fairs a year and summer camp. Without summer camp it is really hard.I actually decided to push for Eagle between 15 and 16, at the rank of Star (where I had been for over a year.) At that point by merely being active for five to six years I had 80% of the merit badges I needed. I earned two merit badges and got life, The final push was terrible because I turned 18 in February 2005, and several merit badges are really hard to complete in the winter. I completed both Swimming and the Physical Fitness badge in the dead of winter, which included weekly swim classes and running laps around a frozen track. I didn’t know until that point that breathing could hurt, but it taught me something about pushing through to a goal.BSA is a lot like college. Ranks and achievements are important, but what counts for more is the growth and experience. The big forces that made me make the final push were knowing adults who had barely missed getting Eagle, and my family’s support.(13 years ago at my Eagle Court of Honor.)
How does one prepare to be an Eagle Scout?
Eagle is the highest rank earned by a Boy Scout. To be an Eagle, you must live by the Scout Oath and the Scout Law. You must attain all the rank requirements, including merit badges, service and leadership through Life Scout.As a Life Scout, you must serve actively in your troop and hold a position of leadership for at least six months. You must have earned at least 21 merit badges since becoming a scout. You must earn at least eleven of the Eagle required badges (some badges have alternates, like swimming, and cycling).Finally you must find a service project, which you will lead. You must make an agreement with the beneficiary of your project as to the scope and implementation of your project. You must get the approval of the Council’s Eagle Board of Review. You must plan and execute your project, including fund raising, and managing your team. You will then present your final report to the Board of Review. If you have been successful, the Eagle Board of Review will approve you for the rank of Eagle Scout.
How prestigious is Eagle Scout standing to potential employers?
I think this is largely dependent on the employer and more specifically on the relation of the individual interviewing you to the Boy Scouts of America.I’ve always had my standing as an Eagle Scout listed on my resume and in probably about half of the interviews I’ve ever done I’ve had it mentioned by my interviewer.While interviewing for one of my first jobs ever at Liberty Mutual Insurance, one interviewer mentioned her son was a Life Scout and that he was getting ready to complete his Eagle Scout project. We then talked about my own Eagle Scout project and scouting in general for a few minutes. I don’t believe I was offered a job at Liberty Mutual solely because I was an Eagle Scout, but I also don’t think it hurt.While interviewing at Google, I again had two interviewers bring up how much they had enjoyed being Boy Scouts and how much their children either were or had previously enjoyed the experience.Specific to the United States military, being an Eagle Scout actually does quite a bit for you both as an officer and as enlisted personnel. When I was applying for the United States Marine Corps Officer Candidate School a large part of why I believe my application was accepted was due to my having talked about my time in scouting and the lessons it taught me. In 2014 alone, 413 graduates from the United States combined military academies were Eagle Scouts.From an enlisted perspective, Eagle Scouts enter the Marine Corps as a Private First Class (E2) rather than an E1 which means increased pay and responsibility from day one in the fleet. You can actually enter as an E3 as an Eagle Scout in the United States Army but the Marines specifically cap enlistment at E2.More than anything, being an Eagle Scout demonstrates to a potential employer that you are hard-working, have reasonable time management skills, and that you have had instilled within you an adherence to a set of principles and values which you will likely carry with you for the rest of your life.
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