eagle scout project application
eagle scout project application
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eagle scout project application 2017-2019

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FAQ

How do I ask for donations for my Eagle Scout Project?
Much depends on what your Eagle project is.For instance, if you’re painting, Sherwin Williams stores often will donate paint if you simply ask the manager (and only need 5–10 gallons of basic paint). Home Depot stores often provide Councils with gift cards. Lowes managers can give material donations and/or discounts on purchased items, if you ask. Figure out what, exactly, you need and then approach stores than can provide it. Be sure to go in uniform and speak to the owner or manager.If you need to do fundraising to get cash to buy supplies for your project, first fill out the Fundraising sheet in the project package. Then start schmoozing with everyone you know. Tell them what you’re doing and what you need. Every dollar helps. If your beneficiary is a tax-deductible organization, then ask your contact if the organization will provide donation receipts for the donors’ taxes.And remember - you’re a Boy Scout on a mission. Most people WANT to help with an Eagle Project, so don’t be shy about asking.
Is it possible to carry out an Eagle Scout project in 3 months?
Yes, absolutely.As many others have suggested, budgeting to have 6 months or a year is better, but 3 months is doable. I believe I have seen them go from idea to completion in as little as a month (with all approvals), but those are amazingly rare.The right follow on question is “How do I carry out an Eagle Scout project in just 3 months?”It is all about the project, especially the various layers of extra approval you have to go through for certain types of projects. Avoid projects that require government approval, such as zoning permits, building permits, inspections, or where a government agency or board is the recipient. It can be hard enough getting approval from your Scoutmaster, Committee Chair, District or Council representative, and the Beneficiary. Don’t add MORE required approvals.The ideal beneficiary is represented by a single person who has the authority to approve your project and accept it as done WITHOUT going to a “the board”, “ the membership”, or anyone else for approval. When you meet with your beneficiary, make sure you understand their level of authority to approve your project.The ideal project comes with its own funding. Some organizations that need work done have money for the materials, and they just need you to design the project, find the labor, and direct the project to completion. Many Eagles raise funds to complete their project, but that takes extra time, so avoid it if possible, if you are on a tight deadline.Be super polite about it, but do let those you are working with understand your timeline. Expect to bend over backwards to accommodate their needs if they are helping you to meet your schedule. (For example, I met with a scout about 9 or 10 PM on the day before his 18th birthday to sign some things for an Eagle Scout candidate. He drove to the campsite where the troop was camping, because that was where *I* was going to be on that day. A scout is helpful, and I was happy to help, but in that case he needed to come to me.)Be FLEXIBLE. (Or as they say in Woodbadge, “Semper Gumby. Always Flexible.”) Your ideal project might be an outdoor construction project like a trail or a dock. If the time you have left is December to February, and you are in Minnesota, it isn’t going to work. Pick something that is mostly or entirely indoors. (However, I have seen scouts build and install docks in Virginia in the winter, where they had to chip through the ice to get to the bottom of the pond to dig the underwater hole for the support posts. It is amazing what a motivated group of scouts can accomplish!)Good luck with your project!
What are good strategies to become an Eagle Scout?
These are all great answers. However, let me stress the importance of not wasting time. The advanced ranks have time requirements and leadership requirements. If you lollygag around and wait until you are 17 to earn Star, you will not make Eagle. Even earning Life could be tricky. Of course, if you are goofing off in your early Scout years, you probably don't really care if you earn your Eagle. Hopefully your troop leaders are watching your progress and can step in early enough to keep you on track if you really do want to earn Eagle. You probably want to have earned your Life rank by the time you're 15. As you go through your teen years, there are more and more distractions pulling you away. If Eagle Scout is a goal for you, you have to allow for those distractions, whether it's a sport season keeping you from getting to meetings for a few months (which can affect holding a leadership position), or getting a part-time job to earn money for college (which can affect going to summer camp and working on merit badges). In the middle of all of this, you need to hold a meaningful, elected troop position, and pulled off the planning and execution of an Eagle project, while finishing up your required merit badges (some of which also have time requirements). Finally, keep track of everything you do, including dates of achievements, and camp-outs. Your troop should also be keeping track, but use their records to verify your own. Perhaps you finished a merit badge and forgot to turn in your blue card. When in doubt, the troop record will prevail. Good luck!
What kind of effect does being an Eagle Scout have on college applications?
Becoming an Eagle Scout does (usually) look great on an application, because it requires commitment, hard work, persistence, initiative in coming up with projects, and indicates a willingness to help others. Becoming an Eagle Scout is very difficult, and if you accomplish that while doing very well academically, then it’s a sign that you can handle a lot of work at once. I met three Eagle Scouts while at MIT. Outside of college, I knew one person who had managed to become an Eagle Scout, and that was my dad, who went to Dartmouth. I don’t remember meeting anyone at MIT who was a Boy Scout but hadn’t become an Eagle Scout (except for maybe a couple people who did like a year of Cubs when they were eight or whatever, which doesn’t really count.)My friends who were Eagle Scouts told me all about what it takes to achieve that, and it is not for the faint of heart. It therefore would undoubtedly look impressive on a college application to be an Eagle Scout. But my guess is that if you try to become an Eagle Scout solely for the purpose of making your college application look better, then you are unlikely to succeed. It seems you need to show real leadership and dedication to being the best Scout you can be for the sake of others, and if that alone doesn't motivate you, then it will likely be very hard to push yourself to do it over the length of time it takes. Also, all the schools you mentioned like to interview students and get a personal take on their activities. If your only motivation for becoming an Eagle Scout is to get into college, then that is likely to be apparent in an interview. And that certainly won’t help your application - top-tier universities like the ones you mentioned want students to have drive and passion for the things that they do and not just do them as a stepping stone to get into college.
Is it a requirement to have only one signature form in an eagle scout project?
Not at all!The paperwork for the project has to have several signatures.The person who the project is for, his or her signature.The Scoutmaster’s or Eagle Coach’s approval at the Troop level.Board of Review’s signature (usually 3 people on that Board of Review).
What are some of the best tips to prepare for an Eagle Scout project?
Don’t rush. It’s harder when younger. Maturity helpsGet an ‘advisor’. Someone who’s done it or helped others (some units have people like that. They turn out more Eagles. But, even if yours doesn’t - try to find someone with experience.Whatever you work on last - CAN turn into a mental challenge. So, DONT do the project last. Do it near, NOT at, the endAlllow time. Don’t try to do a lot just before your 18th birthday. “Things happen” , so allow an extra MONTH OR two.The project is supposed to help you practice being the boss, problem solving, and other stuff that’s it’s handy to have as you turn into an adult. (That’s why I prefer NOT pushing (at 13, 14, or ?? You’ve got growing to do)Don't LET AN ADULT DO IT FOR YOU — Advice is very good but YOU choose. It may be that some choices would be better if you let the adult rule. BUT, YOU learn by doing even if you make a poor decision. So be polite when refusing to go down someone else’s road. It YOUR project (DONT do this lightly) BUT, if your advisor won’t budge, get OTHER advice. You CAN change your advisingAN Eagle Project is NOT a show. So, don’t spend big bucks or time on the physical report. Well written, neat, some pics or diagrams help. But NO ‘ GOLD GUILT’ fancy shamancy, have some one check it for big boo boos BUT DO WHAT THE National BSA says and write about it. Whatever you do keep your eyes open and BE PREPARED⚜️⚜️Bob
What are some good ways to raise money for an eagle scout project?
It entirely depends on the project, the amount of money needed and the District or Council in which the project is approved. Read and follow the Guidance from Guide to Advancement and the Eagle Project Workbook, from scouting.org.Crowdfunding/gofundme sites are a good example -National doesn’t explicitly forbid their use, but some councils do. Start by getting the explicit, current limits for your Troop, District and Council, and understand the Guide to Advancement on fundraising. Get approval of your plan before you start.I would encourage you to consider plans and service projects that substitute donation of time and materials for collecting money. “Projects may not be fundraisers. In other words, the candidate may not stage an effort that primarily collects money, even if it is for a worthy charity.” It is extraordinarily easy for a project that collects money, buys stuff, then donates stuff to slip over into a simple fundraiser though last minute changes. Then you’re stuck defending something that isn’t an Eagle project as appropriate - or being sent back at the end because the District won’t approve your modified project.Leading people in an effort is far more Eagle worthy than simply raising money and buying stuff.That said, you can:Find a plan that does not depend on donated money, donate materials and time, only. Economize. Use your Troop and your charter organization.Mow lawns, work, save your money.Develop a fundraiser with your Troop (bonus: that counts as leadership). Bake sale. Popcorn sales.Take a collection among the members of your family.Use funding and materials from your beneficiary.Crowdsource, ping your Facebook friends, etc.The Eagle Scout Rank - Boy Scouts of AmericaEagle Scout Service Project Workbook - Boy Scouts of Americafor example:Crowdfunding sites and Eagle project fundraisinghttp://www.baltimorebsa.org/docu...
What are some eagle scout project ideas to help in Africa?
I’d stay away from projects like that unless you prepared actually to go there and run the project. When I was a troop committee chairman, I rejected a project proposed by a Scout who wanted to help build houses in Vietnam. Since he was not actually going to go there, it was essentially a fundraising program. That is not what we wanted to see in a “leadership and service” project. You can’t run something like that from a distance. Unless the Scout is right there, getting his hands dirty and directing the activities of others in actually fulfilling the project, it is not a suitable proposal, in my view.
When is the last possible date to submit an Eagle Scout rank application?
All Eagle Scout requirements must be completed before your 18th birthday, barring an exception for special needs. This includes “merit badges, service project, active participation, Scout spirit, position of responsibility, and unit leader conference.” Guide to Advancement 2015 section 9.0.1.1 [As of 11/6/16 the 2015 version is the most current.]However the signatures need not be dated before the Scout’s 18th birthday. (ibid, 9.0.1.3 #2, also 9.0.1.4) Section 9.0.1.5 mentions that a copy should be made of the application, service project workbook, etc. and once the copies are in safekeeping, the originals should be delivered promptly to the council service center. It says timeliness is especially critical if the candidate is approaching or has already turned 18.So clearly, although the work must be completed before the 18th birthday, the application needn’t be turned in by then. The Guide to Advancement recommends that the work be hand delivered if possible, but suggests registered or certified mail if that is not possible.“There is no requirement that the application must be completed or submitted before the 18th birthday. Councils do not have the authority to reject applications submitted on or after that date.” (Guide to Advancement section 9.0.1.5)The Board of Review will be scheduled after all records have been submitted to National and verified, then returned to the local council. No special permission is required for a Board of Review within 3 months after the 18th birthday (hence a good reason to submit your packet in a timely fashion).Between 3 and 6 months after the 18th birthday a letter of explanation for the delay is required, as is special permission from the local council. At 6 months past the 18th birthday or beyond, it becomes a real pain. Letters must be sent to National and permission granted to have a late Board of Review. Don’t be in this situation.Best bet, as everyone will tell you, is to get it all done as early as possible.
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